Aldactone

brand

Aldactone Side Effects

Drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, stomach upset, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or headache may occur. To minimize lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a seated or lying position. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: increased thirst, signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine), mental/mood changes, unusual fatigue/weakness, muscle spasms, menstrual period changes, breast pain, breast enlargement (gynecomastia) in men, sexual function problems, signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), severe stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, dark urine, yellowing of the eyes/skin, easy bruising/bleeding.

This medication may lead to high levels of potassium, especially in patients with kidney problems. If not treated, very high potassium levels can be fatal. Tell your doctor right away if you notice any of the following serious side effects: slow/irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.
  • hypomagnesemia
  • hypocalcemia
  • hyponatremia
  • dehydration
  • hyperkalemia
  • thrombocytopenic disorder
  • agranulocytosis
  • leukopenia
  • neutropenic disorder
  • eosinophilia
  • acute confusion
  • abnormal sexual function
  • libido changes
  • hypersensitivity angiitis
  • vasculitis
  • hypotension
  • gastric ulcer
  • gastritis
  • gastrointestinal irritation
  • gastrointestinal hemorrhage
  • kidney disease with reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR)
  • erectile dysfunction
  • gynecomastia
  • mastalgia
  • amenorrhea
  • irregular menstrual periods
  • menstrual disorder
  • allergic dermatitis
  • toxic epidermal necrolysis
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome
  • pruritus of skin
  • alopecia
  • urticaria
  • cramps in legs
  • drowsy
  • dizziness
  • fever
  • ataxia
  • skin rash
  • headache disorder
  • dyspnea
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal pain with cramps
  • hyperuricemia
  • hyperglycemia
  • anaphylaxis
  • cholestatic hepatitis
  • lethargy
  • hypovolemia
  • maculopapular rash
  • hypochloremic alkalosis
  • DRESS syndrome
  • postmenopausal bleeding

Drug Interactions

See also Precautions section.

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: lithium, drugs that may increase the level of potassium in the blood (such as amiloride, cyclosporine, eplerenone, tacrolimus, triamterene, birth control pills containing drospirenone).

Some products have ingredients that could raise your blood pressure or worsen your swelling. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially cough-and-cold products, diet aids, or NSAIDs such as ibuprofen/naproxen).

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including digoxin or cortisol levels), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.