Acetazolamide ER

generic

Acetazolamide ER Side Effects

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or increased urination may occur, especially during the first few days as your body adjusts to the medication. Blurred vision, dry mouth, drowsiness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or changes in taste may also occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: tingling of the hands/feet, hearing loss, ringing in the ears, unusual tiredness, easy bleeding/bruising, fast/irregular heartbeat, muscle cramps/pain, mental/mood changes (such as confusion, difficulty concentrating), signs of liver disease (such as nausea/vomiting that doesn't stop, stomach/abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine), signs of kidney problems (such as painful urination, pink/bloody urine, change in the amount of urine), signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn't go away, fever, chills).

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.
  • hypoglycemic disorder
  • hyponatremia
  • acidosis
  • hypokalemia
  • hemolytic anemia
  • pancytopenia
  • aplastic anemia
  • idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • agranulocytosis
  • leukopenia
  • blood dyscrasias
  • acute confusion
  • depression
  • myopia
  • tinnitus
  • hearing disorder
  • hepatic necrosis
  • obstructive hyperbilirubinemia
  • black tarry stools
  • renal failure
  • kidney stone
  • hematuria
  • skin photosensitivity
  • toxic epidermal necrolysis
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome
  • erythema
  • urticaria
  • drowsy
  • seizure disorder
  • dizziness
  • fever
  • fatigue
  • dysgeusia
  • parosmia
  • ataxia
  • anorexia
  • headache disorder
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • hyperglycemia
  • glycosuria
  • crystalluria
  • abnormal hepatic function tests
  • anaphylaxis
  • injection site sequelae
  • paresthesia
  • malaise
  • jaundice
  • flaccid paralysis

Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: cisapride, lithium, memantine, methenamine, orlistat, certain drugs used to treat seizures (topiramate, zonisamide).

Check the labels on all your medicines because they may contain aspirin or aspirin-like drugs (salicylates), which can cause serious side effects if taken in large doses with this medication. However, if your doctor has directed you to take low-dose aspirin for heart attack or stroke prevention (usually at dosages of 81-325 milligrams a day), you should continue taking it unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Some products have ingredients that could worsen your swelling. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially NSAIDs such as ibuprofen/naproxen).

This medication may interfere with certain lab tests, possibly causing false test results. Make sure lab personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.