Acetazolamide ER

generic

Acetazolamide ER Dosage & Precautions

Before taking acetazolamide, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: adrenal gland problems (such as Addison's disease), untreated mineral imbalance (such as low sodium/potassium, hyperchloremic acidosis), dehydration, kidney disease, liver disease, breathing problems (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD, emphysema, lung infection), diabetes, gout, narrow-angle glaucoma, overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

While this medication can help you get used to high altitudes and help you tolerate quick climbs, it cannot completely prevent serious altitude sickness. Symptoms of serious altitude sickness may include: severe shortness of breath, mental/mood changes (such as confusion, difficulty concentrating), lack of coordination/staggering walk, extreme tiredness, severe headache.

If you develop any of these symptoms, it is very important that you descend to a lower altitude as quickly as possible to prevent serious, possibly fatal problems.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy or blur your vision. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

This drug may rarely make your blood sugar rise, which can cause or worsen diabetes. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination.

If you already have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. This medication may also lower your blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness or tingling hands/feet. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar. If you don't have these reliable forms of glucose, rapidly raise your blood sugar by eating a quick source of sugar such as table sugar, honey, or candy, or by drinking a glass of orange juice or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor right away about the reaction and the use of this product. To help prevent low blood sugar, eat meals on a regular schedule, and do not skip meals.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Older adults may be more sensitive to its effects, especially dizziness and lightheadedness.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

This medication passes into breast milk but is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.